Conference Proceedings - Full Volumes

Venue

BHUBANESWAR

Date of Conference

8-19-2012

ISBN

978-93-82208-10-5

Publication Date

8-19-2012

Files

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Committee Members of the Conference

Programme Chair Prof. (Dr.) Srikanta Patnaik Chairman, I.I.M.T., Bhubaneswar Intersceince Campus, At/Po.: Kantabada, Via-Janla, Dist-Khurda Bhubaneswar, Pin:752054. Orissa, INDIA.

About the Conference

With an emerging and exponential growth of computational solutions to multifarious sociotechnical problems, the field of computer science is celebrated with radical innovations and advancements. The standing philosophy of such an enduring discipline is to duplicate the abilities of human vision by electronically perceiving and understanding an image. This image understanding can be seen as the disentangling of symbolic information from image data using models constructed with the aid of geometry, physics, statistics, and learning theory. As a technological discipline, computer vision seeks to apply its theories and models to the construction of computer vision systems. Examples of applications of computer vision include systems for, Controlling processes (e.g., an industrial robot), navigation (e.g. by an autonomous vehicle or mobile robot), detecting events (e.g., for visual surveillance or people counting), organizing information (e.g., for indexing databases of images and image sequences), modeling objects or environments (e.g., medical image analysis or topographical modeling), interaction (e.g., as the input to a device for computer-human interaction), automatic inspection, e.g. in manufacturing applications. The field is embodied with diversified with many application areas such as: medical computer vision or medical image processing. This area is characterized by the extraction of information from image data for the purpose of making a medical diagnosis of a patient. Generally, image data is in the form of microscopy images, X-ray images, angiography images, ultrasonic images, and tomography images. A second application area in computer vision is in industry, sometimes called machine vision, where information is extracted for the purpose of supporting a manufacturing process. Military applications are probably one of the largest areas for computer vision. The obvious examples are detection of enemy soldiers or vehicles and missile guidance. One of the newer application areas is autonomous vehicles, which include submersibles, land-based vehicles (small robots with wheels, cars or trucks), aerial vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The organization of a computer vision system is highly application dependent. Some systems are stand-alone applications which solve a specific measurement or detection problem, while others constitute a sub-system of a larger design which, for example, also contains sub-systems for control of mechanical actuators, planning, information databases, man-machine interfaces, etc. The specific implementation of a computer vision system also depends on if its functionality is pre-specified or if some part of it can be learned or modified during operation. The concept and creation of machines that could operate autonomously dates back to classical times, but research into the functionality and potential uses of robots did not grow substantially until the 20th century. Today, robotics is a rapidly growing field, as we continue to research, design, and build new robots that serve various practical purposes, whether domestically, commercially, or militarily. Many robots do jobs that are hazardous to people such as defusing bombs, exploring shipwrecks, and mines.

Publisher

Institute for Project Management Pvt. Ltd.

City

BHUBANESWAR

Keywords

Human Robot Interaction, Chess playing robot

Disciplines

Computer and Systems Architecture | Computer Engineering | Data Storage Systems | Digital Circuits | Digital Communications and Networking | Hardware Systems | Robotics | Systems and Communications

Editorial

Computer Vision and Robotic is one of the most challenging areas of 21st century. Its application ranges from Humanoid to Man-less-plant, Deep-sea-application to Space application, and Agriculture to Medicine, House hold good to Industries. Today’s technologies demand to produce intelligent machine, which are enabling applications in various domains and services. Robotics is one such area which encompasses number of technology in it and its application is wide spread. Computational or machine vision is the most challenging tool for the robot to make it intelligent. To perceive the real world scenario which is 3D in nature from the normal camera which takes images in 2D plane is the most challenging job for the researchers who are working in this area. For many people it is a machine that imitates a human—like the androids in Star Wars, Terminator and Star Trek: The Next Generation. However much these robots capture our imagination, such robots still only inhabit Science Fiction. People still haven't been able to give a robot enough 'common sense' to reliably interact with a dynamic world. However, Rodney and his team at MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab are working on creating such humanoid robots. Robotics had become a craze nowadays. The type of robots that you will encounter most frequently are robots that do work that is too dangerous, boring, onerous, or just plain nasty. Most of the robots in the world are of this type. They can be found in auto, medical, manufacturing and space industries. In fact, there are over a million of these type of robots working for us today. Some robots like the Mars Rover Sojourner and the upcoming Mars Exploration Rover, or the underwater robot Caribou help us learn about places that are too dangerous for us to go. While other types of robots are just plain fun for kids of all ages. Popular toys such as Techno, Polly or AIBO ERS-220 seem to hit the store shelves every year around Christmas time. And as much fun as robots are to play with, robots are even much more fun to build. In Being Digital, Nicholas Negroponte tells a wonderful story about an eight year old, pressed during a televised premier of MIT Media Lab's LEGO/Logo work at Hennigan School. A zealous anchor, looking for a cute sound bite, kept asking the child if he was having fun playing with LEGO/Logo. Clearly exasperated, but not wishing to offend, the child first tried to put her off. After her third attempt to get him to talk about fun, the child, sweating under the hot television lights, plaintively looked into the camera and answered, "Yes it is fun, but it's hard fun." Chief Mentor Prof. (Dr.) Srikanta Patnaik

Proceedings of International Conference on Computational Vision And Robotics

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